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    The latest versions of Toyota Allion and Premio was released in mid-2016. The two models has come with significant design as well as technological improvements. This time, Toyota has blurred the boundaries of the design in both of the cars and given a one common overall design to the front and the back while specifying 2 different levels of detailing and trim. Despite that fact, the design this time is really impressive. Firstly, let's watch the video that we did as the comparison between the two cars.

     

    The 2 cars have been built on the same chassis as the predecessors', the NZE-260. but in the exterior, the hood (bonnet), front fenders and the front and rear buffers have been redesigned with different levels of detailing. The front lamps are LED including the head lamp. Tail lights are a combination of both LED and conventional lighting. The ground clearance has also been increased a bit which is a better sign. 

    This time, there is no "G-Superior" in the Premio. Instead the "EX-Package" as the highest option level in the Premio and G-Plus in the Allion. In the video, there are those highest grades.

    The Premio that we took to has the New body colour which they call it as "Dark Red Mica Metallic" which is more Redish than the wine-red of the out going version (Different colour codes). The white is all the same and it is the Pearl-white (metallic white) in the video. 

    The 2 cars are equipped with more sophisticated technological aspects. Mainly the safety features like,

    High Beam Assist: Which will control the high beam (Head light) by it self. When driving at night, due to the HBA system we no more need to put the lights into Full or Dim. When a car is coming towards, the system automatically dims the light and immediately after its passed, the lights are put into full. 

    Lane Departure Assist: The system will give a warning if the driver is crossing between the lanes unsafely. The display in the dashboard displays the regarding information. 

    Pre-Safe Collision Assist: The car brakes by itself if the driver did not take necessary actions in the situation where a collision could happen. The system works under the speed of 50Km/h. It is the Same as the CTBA which came in Honda. Additionally with the ultra sonic sensors on the front and rear bumpers (buffers) the system detects if there are short collision objects even when the car is moving in a tight parking lot. The system boosts brake even the driver has applied brakes slightly which would not sufficient to stop the car. The on dash display visualizes how close you are to a collision object. 

    This time they have added the Engine Auto Stop function which turns off the engine when it is in idle in order to maximize the fuel efficiency. For an instance, when you are waiting for the green light, The Auto Stop will work until you take the foot off the brake pedal. Immediately after the brakes are released, the engine comes up and ready when your foot reaches the accelerator (no delay). 

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    The first question when a tourist visit to Sri Lanka is, "why you guys are honking this much?". A question that I even don't know the answer.

    We Sri Lankans uses our car horn for every reason. If we see a friend; we honk, if we see an enemy; we honk, if we see a girl; we honk, if we want to overtake; we honk, we are rather than driving the car; we honk the horn. In my personal experience, near Orugodawatte Junction in the morning time we can hear more than 25 honks per minute.

    Following are some honking etiquettes that I presume too good to share.

    When is it appropriate to use your horn? Generally, you should only honk the horn when reasonably necessary to insure safe driving. For example, if your brakes have gone out, honk to alert other drivers.

    Use your horn to promote safe driving

    However, there are times when it is common and acceptable to use your horn when there’s no immediate threat of a crash. Keep in mind that there is a big difference between giving a quick “beep” and laying on your horn with an obnoxious “BEEEEEEEEEEP”. For example, if the driver in front of you at a red light is not paying attention when the light changes to green, wait at least 4 seconds and then give a light, quick tap on the horn.

    If another driver is driving too close to the lane line or almost hits you, it is appropriate to give a quick “beep” to let them know that they made a driving error and need to be more cautious. A quick honk of the horn can mean “Watch what you’re doing!”

    Don’t use your horn to vent frustration

    Your horn is not a way for you to tell another driver you don’t like their driving. If someone’s driving creates an ongoing danger, call the police. Never lay on your horn out of frustration with another driver.

    Many instances of road rage begin with aggressive horn honking. You never know another driver’s state of mind, the kind of day they’re having, or how they’ll react to your blaring horn. Your safety is the top priority, so be calm when driving. If you must honk your horn at someone, do it lightly. Also, do not yell, mouth words, or use hand gestures to show your anger.

    Don’t use your horn to ask “What’s Happening?”

    Do not honk at your friends because this could alarm other drivers. You may startle another driver into slamming on their brakes, aborting their turn, or performing some other dangerous maneuver. Your horn is not a way to say “Hey” as you drive past your friends.

    No, your horn cannot magically clear a traffic jam

    If you’re stuck in a traffic jam, don’t honk. It isn’t going to make the situation any better; in fact, it will make it worse for everyone around you. Unless you are in a parade or stuck in a parking garage after your favorite baseball team just won the World Series, you should never lay on your horn in traffic.

    Honking is sometimes against the law

    In some cities, honking your horn between certain hours is against the law. I don’t think anyone will miss the neighborhood carpool mom honking at 6:00 a.m. to get the kids outside. You don’t have to worry about breaking the law if you use your horn only when absolutely necessary. Not wanting to get out of the car and ring the doorbell is not grounds for using your horn.

    Honk if you’re …

    Honking does not always pertain to alerting other drivers. Honking has become a way of showing support. For example, some people honk when they drive past students having car wash fund raisers. In Detroit, a U.S. District Judge ruled that not allowing “honking for peace” in anti-war demonstrations would be against the First Amendment.

    The bottom line is to refrain from immediately reacting to a driver’s “wrong” move by laying on your horn or even giving a quick beep. People make mistakes and sometimes you need to just let it go rather than using your horn to vent. The simple rule: only use your horn when necessary.

    When practicing with your teen, watch how he or she reacts when other drivers make mistakes. Discuss why honking would or would not have been appropriate for each situation.

     

    Thank you!

     

    Danushka.